Combined Child Training

A two-year program in either child psychotherapy or child psychoanalysis, this program combines weekly videoconferencing seminars with twice yearly in-person conferences, featuring presenters invested in child work.

This 2-year, 2-hours-a-week, high quality, distance learning and on-site training course is for adult analysts and child psychotherapists who wish to learn child analysis, and for adult psychotherapists who wish to work with children.

Distance learning occurs on secure Zoom on Friday afternoons from 1:00 – 3:00 pm EST. The program includes immersion in-residence experiences at two summer institutes and four weekend conferences in the two years plus online seminars, case conferences, group discussion, individual online consultation, and treatment.

Program Description

The International Psychotherapy Institute offers a Combined Child Analysis and Child Psychotherapy Training Program, now in its third iteration. This high quality distance learning and on-site training program is for adult analysts and child psychotherapists who wish to learn child analysis, for child psychotherapists who wish to enhance their skills and dynamic understanding, and for adult psychotherapists who wish to work with children. The program includes immersion in-residence experiences at two summer institutes and four weekend conferences in the two years plus online seminars, case conferences, group discussion, individual online consultation, and treatment.

The first year begins on June 8, 2019 on site in Rockville MD with an immersion program on Foundations of Object Relations Theory,reviewing the major contributions of Klein, Balint, Bion, Bowlby, Guntrip, Segal, Sutherland, Winnicott and more recent contributors, Bollas, Casement, Joseph, Mitchell, Ogden, Tustin, and Scharff and Scharff, and continues weekly online on secure Zoom on Friday afternoons from 1:00 – 3:00 pm East coast time.  The two first year online seminar courses are The Treatment Situation and Child Development.

The second year begins with another in-residence immersion course on site in Rockville, MD, this time on Infant Observation, Attachment Theory, Neuroscience, and Developmental and Cultural Contexts for Treatment, and continues weekly online on secure Zoom on Friday afternoons from 1:00 – 3:00 pm East coast time. The second year online seminar courses are Psychopathology and Wellness in Childhood, and Literature of Child Psychotherapy or ChIld Analysis. After each combined seminar are ongoing clinical case conference series and GAM groups in which to internalize the learning and develop an ethical stance.

Graduate analyst, and graduates of IPI’s CORE program may be excused from the two summer institutes.

Program Date(s):

June 8, 2019

Program Faculty

Carl Bagnini, LCSW, BCD
Combined Program Faculty

Ana Maria Barroso, MD
Combined Program Faculty

Doug Dennett, MD
Combined Program Faculty

Vali Maduro, Ph.D.
Combined Program Faculty

Norka Malberg, Psy.D.
Combined Program Faculty

Karen Proner, MS, FIPA
Combined Program Faculty

David Scharff, MD
Combined Program Faculty

Jill Scharff, MD
Combined Program Faculty

Caroline Sehon, MD
Combined Program Faculty

Lea de Setton, Ph.D.
Combined Program Faculty

Stan Tsigounis, Ph.D.
Combined Program Faculty

Virginia Ungar, MD
Combined Program Faculty

Yolanda de Varela, Ph.D.
Combined Program Faculty

Janine Wanlass, Ph.D.
Combined Program Faculty

Adela Abella, MD
Child Analytic Track Only Faculty

Björn Salomonsson, Ph.D., MD
Child Analytic Track Only Faculty

Judith Chused, MD
Child Analytic Track Only Faculty

Carla Elliot-Neely, Ph.D.
Child Analytic Track Only Faculty

Ted Jacobs, MD
Child Analytic Track Only Faculty

Jill Miller, Ph.D.
Child Analytic Track Only Faculty

Dr. Diana Norsa
Child Analytic Track Only Faculty

Louise Gyler
Guest Teacher, Analytic Track

Minne Dastur, MD
Guest Adjunct Supervisor, Analytic Track

Program Components

  • Four major seminars deal with child and adolescent development, the treatment situation including work with parents and families, childhood psychopathology and wellness, and literature of child psychotherapy and child analysis featuring consultation to schools and agencies, multicultural awareness, family therapy, gender considerations, etc.
  • The clinical case conferences feature a series of 5 continuous case conferences.
  • IPI’s signature GAM groups (small discussion groups using the Group Affective Model) attend to the development of the therapist/analysts’ identity and ethical stance
  • A weekly clinical case discussion conducted on secure video conference.
  • Individual weekly consultation on two cases (psychotherapy trainees) and three cases (child analytic candidates)
  • Personal treatment conducted in the office or on secure video conference.

The course is built on an Object Relations Foundation:

The proposed readings reflect classical and contemporary psychoanalytic literature, including theories of A. Freud, Klein, Winnicott, Bornstein, Solnit, Abrams, the Sandlers, Tustin, Bick, Gaddini, Harris, Fraiberg, the Tysons, Laufer, Pine; the research of Stern, Emde, Fonagy, Target, Coates, and Salomonsson; and the contemporary work of Ferro, Gilmore, the Novicks, Lemma, Yanof, O’Shaugnessy, Pick, Chused, and the Scharffs.

Friday Afternoons

Combined didactic theory
1:00-2:00 (EST)

Separate track continuous case conference & GAM Group
2:00-3:00 (EST)

In the first year, a combined curriculum.In one shared weekly hour, child psychotherapy trainees and child analytic candidates study together in combined theory courses in childhood psychopathology and wellness, theory of child development, attachment theory, the basic psychoanalytic situation, techniques to establish and maintain a relationship with a child, provisioning the office setting, theory of play, using play creatively, transference, countertransference, relating to parents, families, co-workers, agencies, teachers and pediatricians, sensitivity to diversity, ethics, the use and impact of technology, and research techniques.

In the other weekly hour, child psychotherapy and child analysis trainees study in separate tracks for their respective clinical case conferences and GAM groups.

In the second year, a separate curriculum.In both hours, child psychotherapy and child analysis trainees study separately in specialized psychotherapy or psychoanalysis theory, literature, advanced technique courses, clinical case conferences, and GAM groups.

The GAM group is a special feature of this IPI child psychotherapy and child analytic training program. In the Group Affective Model for teaching and learning child analytic psychotherapy and child analysis, trainees meet in GAM groups with the task of integrating their emotional responses to the challenging primitive material encountered in work with young children and adolescents, confronting diversity with sensitivity, studying the social unconscious of the group, developing an ethical analytic stance, and securing their identity as either child analysts or child psychotherapists.

Course Requirements

Educational requirements
Satisfactory attendance at weekly online classes and 3 in-residence immersions per year.

Clinical Requirements Specific tor Child Psychotherapy

Child psychotherapy trainees will undertake two cases (a pre-oedipal child, latency child and/or adolescent not all the same gender) in 1 or 2 times per week child psychotherapy. One case will be for one year, and one case will be for 18 months for a total minimum of 280 hours of child psychotherapy.

The training cases will be discussed with different faculty consultants once a week for a total minimum of 105 hours of consultation.  Consultant and trainee will conduct annual review of the consultative process in a mutual review process and complete evaluation forms and a short report of the treatment (1 page is sufficient).

A trainee enrolled in the IPI PPP program in advanced psychotherapy may get credit for one child case towards the PPP certificate if pre-approved by the PPP Chair. Those who do not finish in two years will join the first year clinical case conference in subsequent years. Before graduation, child psychotherapy trainees will have presented their work in a clinical case conference in the child program or at IPI.

 

Clinical Requirements specific to Child Analysis
Child analytic trainees will meet requirements for three child analytic cases (treated 3-5 times a week), weekly child analytic consultation, and (non-reporting) personal analysis if made necessary by the challenges of working with children. Until case requirements for the child analytic training program are met, the child analytic candidate will progress into the third year to attend the weekly child analytic case conference.

In keeping with ApsaA requirements, candidates will conduct supervised analysis of 3 cases of different gender and developmental stage, the child seen at 3 – 5 times a week for a minimum of one year, showing analytic process, plus parent or family work (which count toward the total clinical hours), the candidate in weekly consultation of 40 hours each, for a total minimum of 400 clinical hours and 150 consultation hours. We have a strong preference for one case to continue for more than one year, and for at least a part of one analysis to be conducted at the more intense level.  After determining the candidate’s total amount of experience and degree of growth in consultation, more may be required and exceptions may be granted.  Pre-matriculation course work, additional seminars, and child therapy experience may be suggested or required of applicants on an individual basis after the application has been reviewed.  For adult analysts who do not have much child therapy experience, an individualized enrichment program will be designed such as reading, observation in local child clinics, attendance at a child and family institute, additional child therapy consultation, and attendance at psychotherapy seminars to deepen their comfort with and understanding of the child.  Candidates may attend the 2nd year psychotherapy seminar as a tuition benefit if this is suggested for enrichment.

A late adolescent case that counted for graduation from an adult training program may count as one case toward meeting the requirements for graduation as a child analyst.

Educational Objectives

GENERAL LEARNING GOALS FOR THE CHILD PROGRAM

Participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a knowledge based of historical and contemporary theory applicable to clinical work with children, adolescents, and their families
  • Write in detail and present process notes
  • Engage in discussion of case material non-defensively
  • Demonstrate the factors conducive to therapeutic action in child psychotherapy and child analysis
  • Apply concepts of the setting, analytic observation and listening, play, use of countertransference and interpretation, and working through in individual child treatment
  • Work collaboratively with parents
  • Develop a reflective, ethical stance

 

1 Learning Goals for the Continuous Child Case Conference

  • Listen, wait, wonder, and speak respectfully to the presenter
  • Observe resistance, transference and countertransference
  • Develop a capacity for being in uncertainty
  • Track the effect of an interpretation

1 Learning Objectives for Continuous Case Conference: Participants will be able to:

  • Delineate 1 aspect of therapeutic action
  • Give one example of a countertransference used to construct a transference interpretation

2 Learning Goals for the GAM group

  • Listen respectfully to others’ experience
  • Collaborate to achieve understanding
  • Distinguish cognitive learning from affective learning
  • Develop an ethical analytic stance

2 Learning Objectives for GAM group: Participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate 4 principles of ethical behavior in clinical application
  • Present one criticism in a constructive voice

3 Learning Goals for Child/Adolescent Treatment Situation:

  • Establish a secure setting in which a child can be expressive
  • Assess the child’s needs and match them to the appropriate recommendation for psychotherapy, psychoanalysis, or other
  • Play constructively and creatively with a child
  • Engage the parents in taking a developmental history and supporting treatment

3 Learning Objectives for Child/Adolescent Treatment Situation

  • Name three toys that are useful for Oedipal play
  • List two defenses seen in an adolescent’s dream

4 Learning Goals for Family and Multicultural Awareness

  • Name specific features of one culture other than their own primary cultural identification
  • Address the impact of family dynamics on the emerging personality of the child and vice versa

4 Learning Objectives for Family and Cultural Awareness

  • Give 1 clinical example of transgenerational trauma
  • Describe 3 features of the social unconscious 

5 Learning Goals for Development

  • Describe the developmental stages from pre-birth to adolescence and note their relevance to adult analysis
  • Distinguish pre-oedipal anxiety from Oedipal conflict
  • Trace the roots of sexual and aggressive expressions in children and adolescents to the individual and family histories
  • Explore the cultural context in each child’s development
  • Describe bodily and mental transitions of early and late adolescence

5 Learning Objectives for Development

  • Describe one play activity typical of an anxious adolescent.
  • Identify two typical defenses of latency
  • List three instinctual responses of infancy

6 Learning Goals for Research and Writing: Participants will

  • Discuss the need for research in child treatment and describe one methodology
  • Identify a suitable topic for qualitative or quantitative investigation or literature review
  • Conduct research on that topic
  • Write their research findings and present them to their classmates

6 Learning Objectives for Research and Writing

  • Select one aspect of their learning and describe it concisely in a 2-page paper
  • Co-teach one topic from child analytic literature applied to child psychotherapy

7 Learning Goals for Psychopathology & Wellness of Childhood:

  • Recognize a healthy child
  • Recognize and distinguish between neurotic, conduct disorder and psychotic behaviors in children
  • Provide an accurate diagnosis
  • Provide a psychoanalytic formulation
  • Distinguish between anxiety and depression

7 Learning Objectives for Psychopathology and Wellness of Childhood

  • Describe three features of a resilient child
  • Select one of the ICD-10 categories and compare it to that aspect of the PDM 2
  • Choose one typical symptom presentation from a child or adolescent and develop a psychoanalytic formulation
  • List two kinds of childhood loss and two kinds of childhood trauma

8 Learning Goals for Advanced Child Analytic Technique

  • Place current child analytic practice in the historical context of child analysis
  • Contain anxiety as work deepens in the mid-phase of child analysis
  • Detect and demonstrate transference with directness and empathy
  • Detect, analyze and use countertransference effectively
  • Explain the role of insight in therapeutic action
  • Distinguish between the concepts of construction and reconstruction
  • Vary analytic technique appropriate to infants, toddlers, school-age children and adolescents
  • Adapt technique using modifications and parameters when indicated

8 Learning Objectives for Advanced Child Analytic Technique

  • Discuss 3 concepts relevant to the development of analytic process
  • Describe 2 phenomena typical of termination in child analysis

9 Learning Goals for Literature of Child Analysis

  • Compare and contrast the work of Anna Freud and Melanie Klein
  • Define Fairbairn’s concept of dissociation in child sexual abuse
  • Distinguish between holding and containment
  • Be proficient in working with drawings, dreams, and play
  • Relate the concept of aggression to the pleasure principle
  • Describe sexual development from infancy to adolescence
  • See the confusion of sexuality and aggression in erotic transference
  • Discuss contemporary approaches to gender non-conformity
  • Engage in discussion of theory and technique with analysts trained in various analytic traditions

9 Learning Objectives for Literature of Child Analysis 

  • List two sequelae of trauma
  • List two components of Bion’s concept of containment
  • List one concept identified with Melanie Klein
  • List three concepts identified with Winnicott.

10 Learning Goals for Plenary

  • Review and assess their learning experience
  • Communicate their difficulties in learning and respond to others’ difficulties respectfully

10 Learning Objectives for Plenary

  • Propose one programmatic change that could improve the course
  • Identify one overlooked topic and suggest two relevant readings to address it

LEARNING OBJECTIVES FOR YEAR 1 and YEAR 2 CHILD PSYCHOTHERAPY PROGRAM

1 Learning Goals for Continuous Case Conference

  • Write and present process notes
  • Engage in discussion of case material non-defensively
  • Demonstrate the factors conducive to therapeutic action in child psychotherapy
  • Apply concepts of the setting, analytic observation and listening, play, use of countertransference and interpretation, and working through

1 Learning Objectives for Continuous Case Conference

  • Delineate 1 aspect of therapeutic action
  • Give one example of a countertransference response used to construct a transference interpretation

2 Learning Goals for GAM group

  • Integrate cognitive and affective aspects of learning
  • Develop an ethical stance as a child psychotherapist

2 Learning Objectives for GAM group

  • Present one criticism in a constructive voice
  • Define cognitive learning and distinguish it from affective learning
  • Demonstrate 4 principles of ethical behavior in clinical application

3 Learning Goals for Child/Adolescent Treatment Situation:

  • Establish a secure setting in which a child can be expressive
  • Assess the child’s needs and match them to the appropriate recommendation for psychotherapy, psychoanalysis, or other
  • Play constructively and creatively with a child
  • Engage the parents in taking a developmental history and supporting treatment
  • Compare the techniques of mentalisation and interpretation of resistance in the opening phase

3 Learning Objectives for Child/Adolescent Treatment Situation

  • Name three toys that are useful for Oedipal play
  • List two defenses seen in an adolescent’s dream
  • Name 1 ethical principle that applies particularly in work with children

4 Learning Goals for Family and Multicultural Awareness

  • Name specific features of a culture other than their own primary cultural identification
  • Address the impact of family dynamics on the emerging child and vice versa
  • Describe the transmission of trauma across generations

4 Learning Objectives for Family and Cultural Awareness

  • Give 1 clinical example of transgenerational trauma
  • Describe 3 features of the social unconscious

5 Learning Goals for Development

  • Describe the developmental stages from pre-birth to adolescence and note their relevance to adult psychotherapy
  • Distinguish pre-oedipal anxiety from oedipal conflict
  • Identify two typical defenses of latency
  • Trace the roots of sexual and aggressive expressions in children and adolescents to the individual and family histories
  • Take account of the cultural context in each child’s development
  • Describe bodily and mental transitions of early and late adolescence

5 Learning Objectives for Development

  • Describe one play activity typical of an anxious adolescent.
  • Identify two typical defenses of latency
  • List three instinctual responses of infancy

6 Learning Goals for Research and Writing: Participants will be able to

  • Discuss the need for research in child treatment and describe one methodology

6 Learning Objectives for Research and Writing

  • Select one aspect of their learning and express their ideas concisely in a 2-page paper
  • Co-teach 1 topic from child psychotherapy literature in the second year

7 Learning Goals for Psychopathology & Wellness of Childhood:

  • Describe the features of a healthy child in terms of resilience
  • Amplify the categories of the ICD-10 with reference to the PDM 2
  • Distinguish between disorders of anxiety and depression
  • Develop a psychodynamic formulation of 3 typical symptom presentations in childhood and adolescence
  • Distinguish between the impact of childhood loss and childhood trauma

7 Learning Objectives for Psychopathology and Wellness of Childhood

  • Describe three features of a resilient child
  • Select one of the ICD-10 categories and compare it to that aspect of the PDM 2
  • Choose one typical symptom presentation from a child or adolescent in treatment and develop a psychoanalytic formulation
  • Distinguish two kinds of childhood loss and two kinds of childhood trauma

8 Learning Goals for Advanced Theory and Technique of Child Psychotherapy

  • Vary psychotherapy technique appropriate to infants, toddlers, school-age children and adolescents
  • Apply sensitivity to diversity in relating to children’s families, schools and agencies
  • Utilize infant observation technique and attachment theory to assess sources of separation anxiety
  • Describe the impact of temperament and type of sibling relationship on the development of the self
  • Distinguish between holding and containment
  • Discuss the role of sexuality and aggression in the development of the self and gender
  • Detect and contain countertransference in work with Oedipal conflict

8 Learning Objectives for Advanced Child Psychotherapy Technique

  • Discuss 3 concepts relevant to the development of therapeutic process
  • Describe 2 phenomena typical of termination in child psychotherapy
  • Give 1 example of addressing transference directly and with empathy

9 Learning Goals for Literature of Child Psychotherapy

  • Compare and contrast the assessment protocols of A. Freud and Greenspan
  • Demonstrate the effective use of drawings, dreams, and play in child psychotherapy
  • Define transitional space and transitional object
  • Define Fairbairn’s concept of dissociation in child sexual abuse
  • Give an example of transference in psychotherapy of an adolescent
  • Give an example of hate in the countertransference in psychotherapy of a latency child
  • Discuss contemporary approaches to gender non-conformity

9 Learning Objectives for Literature of Child Psychotherapy

  • List two sequelae of trauma
  • List two components of Bion’s concept of containment
  • List one concept identified with Melanie Klein
  • List three concepts identified with Winnicott
  • Give 2 examples of the impact of technology on the developing mind
  • Describe 1 potential developmental impact of divorce or adoption on a pre-oedipal child
  • Describe 1 phenomenon often noted in the termination process in child psychotherapy

10 Learning Goals for Plenary

  • Review and assess the learning experience
  • Communicate difficulties in learning so as to look for group solutions
  • Propose programmatic changes that could help child psychotherapy trainees and faculty improve

10 Learning Objectives for Plenary

  • Propose one programmatic change that could improve the course
  • Identify one overlooked topic and suggest two relevant readings to address it

Continuing Education Credit

Continuing education credit for the two-year program is the sum of credit hours for the component parts, approximately  270 credit hours:

  • Two annual online seminars provide approximately 64 hours each:  128 credit hours
  • Attendance at two 3-day weekend conferences approximately 19 hours each:  29 credit hours
  • Attendance at two 6-hour immersion days prior to one of the 3-day conferences each year: 12 credit hours
  • Attendance at two 6-day summer institutes  36 credit hours each; 72 credit hours

Prerequisites

You will have taken, or agree to take the one-year IPI course in infant observation, (separate tuition) or show that you have had equivalent preparation.

Application

There is a combined application form for applying for child analytic or child psychotherapy training.  Your application will be reviewed by the Admissions Committee for your track, and you will be interviewed on Zoom or on the telephone by two faculty members.  You will need to provide to the Psychoanalytic and Psychotherapy Admissions Committees (consisting of supervising child analysts, supervising child psychotherapists, and IPI faculty members) documentation of your previous experience as adult analysts, adult psychotherapists, or child psychotherapists in order to be placed in the appropriate certificate track. You will need to provide other documentation as requested on the application form and two letters of reference preferably from someone known to us.

Once approved, you will be sent a letter of welcome and preparation.  When you return your signed acceptance you will then be registered as a participant in the

Tuition and Fees

Tuition includes membership in the IPI learning community, with access to PEPWEB and free participation in the Master Speaker Videoconference series.

Child Psychotherapy Training: Annual tuition $4,040

Graduate analysts, and graduates of IPI’s CORE program, may be excused from the two summer institutes, in which case their annual tuition would be $2,967.

Child Analytic TrainingAnnual tuition is $4,040

Graduate analysts, and graduates of IPI’s CORE program, may be excused from the two summer institutes, in which case their annual tuition would be $2,967.

Tuition and fees will be negotiated for students who need to continue into a third year in order to complete program requirements.

Fees for child psychotherapy and child analytic consultation and for personal psychotherapy and psychoanalysis will be arranged individually with your faculty consultants and your therapist/analyst.

Program Chair

Jill Savege Scharff, MD


Should you have any questions about the program or the application process, please feel free to contact:

Jill Savege Scharff, MD, Child Analytic Admissions - jillscharff@theipi.org


Should you have any questions about the program or the application process, please feel free to contact:

Janine Wanlass, Ph.D., Child Psychotherapy Admissions - jwanlass@westminstercollege.edu

Continuing Education Information

The International Psychotherapy Institute, IPI, is approved by The American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. IPI maintains responsibility for the program and its content. The International Psychotherapy Institute has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 6017. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The International Psychotherapy Institute is responsible for all aspects of the programs. The International Psychotherapy Institute is an approved sponsor of the Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners for continuing education credits for licensed social workers in Maryland. The International Psychotherapy Institute is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers.

Participants are responsible for verifying that IPI CE credit is accepted by the licensing boards in their own states. Please note: At this time we are aware that CE credit for IPI events will not be accepted by the New Jersey Board of Social Work.

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